The Pandemic Continues

We are limited in our ability to travel by the Covid19 pandemic. A minor inconvenience given the seriousness of what many face with unemployment and sickness. We have difficulty understanding why some individuals will not take precautions such as wearing masks and avoiding crowds. In the World Wars individuals spent years overseas, apart from family members facing uncertainty and death. In that context it does not seem onerous to limit social gatherings, wear a mask and otherwise pay attention to what health officials are saying.

Our travels are limited, but we nevertheless have an opportunity to experience some of the beauty of Canada, in this case it is Banff National Park and Lake Louise.

Bears in Banff and Jasper are common. Living around homo sapiens can be challenging for bears because we often leave food at sites, and once the bears are habituated to human food, they often end up destroyed. 

To deal with this Parks Canada installed an electric wire fence around the Lake Louise campsite. It provides a degree of safety for both bears and people.

Camping at Lake Louise

Bears are not uncommon. In this short trip we saw one brown bear, one black bear and for the second time in my life, grizzly bears. The previous grizzly I saw was travelling in the Yukon.

The blonde grizzly bear and her cub were busy feeding on berries stocking up for the winter ahead. Somewhat safely located on the other side of a fenced area she and her cub worked steadily stripping berries from bushes. Present were two Parks Canada employees watching, and warning us that although unlikely if the bear decided to get aggressive coming through the fence would not be a problem.

Near dusk the pictures are not the best but grizzlies are uncommon enough that we decided to post it.

Grizzly Bear, Banff National Park

Watching the bear was a Parks Canada employee, with a bear spray gun in hand. Her face is blurred for privacy.

SIX GLACIERS – LAKE LOUISE, ALBERTA

August on the way to the Six Glaciers Teahouse
Six Glaciers Trail
Horse Trail – Six Glaciers